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Ben Nadel at the jQuery Conference 2010 (Boston, MA) with: Mike Hostetler
Ben Nadel at the jQuery Conference 2010 (Boston, MA) with: Mike Hostetler@mikehostetler )

Working Code Podcast - Episode 92: The Power Of No

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This week on the show, the crew talks about the Power of No. For many of us, saying "No" is usually a challenge. Saying "Yes", on the other hand, is usually the path of least resistance. Saying "Yes" also feels good. In fact, saying "Yes" has so much appeal that we often rush into saying "Yes" to work before we even understand what that work entails or how urgent that work actually is. And, in many cases, that eager "Yes" ends up leading to a future failure. Which is why getting to "No" - or "No, but..." - can help us maintain both our sanity and our professional relationships.

All that and more on this week's show:

... featuring these beautiful, beautiful people:

With audio editing and engineering by ZCross Media.

For the full show notes and links, visit the episode page. And, be sure to follow the show and come chat with us on Discord! Our website is workingcode.dev and we're @WorkingCodePod on Twitter and Instagram. New episodes drop weekly on Wednesday.

Reader Comments

18 Comments

Regarding SQL code hints after a comma:
Consider using a comma first format, that is, the comma is at the start of a line, not at the end of a line. The main reason I like it is from a source control perspective, when you add a new column to the SELECT, then the changeset is only the line that was changed, not the comma at the end of one line and the added column on the next line.

In this case, you hit enter to go to the next line, then the comma, then the code hints wouldn't pop up until you're actually at a point where you'd have the possibility of needing a hint (column name, function, etc.).

15,329 Comments

@Danilo,

That's an interesting idea. I'm pretty sure that Adam (on the podcast) uses comma-first for a lot of his code specifically for the reason you outlined: the Pull-Request shows only the line that was changed. I feel like I remember the Golang auto-formatter also doing the same thing (for the same reason).

I'm gonna have to let that one soak-in a bit. I'll have to try it out and see how it feels. I suspect that this will be an emotional hurdle - more than anything else - to start adding commas first. But, it's a solid suggestion! 🙌

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