Ben Nadel
On User Experience (UX) Design, JavaScript, ColdFusion, Node.js, Life, and Love.
I am the chief technical officer at InVision App, Inc - a prototyping and collaboration platform for designers, built by designers. I also rock out in JavaScript and ColdFusion 24x7.
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Ben Nadel at Scotch On The Rocks (SOTR) 2011 (Edinburgh) with:

ColdFusion Insert() - How Did I Miss This Function?

By Ben Nadel on
Tags: ColdFusion

I was doing some code evaluation today and I came across someone who was using a method named Insert(). At first I just assumed that this person was using a UDF since the method didn't look familiar to me. But, after checking out my HomeSite Help files, I realized that Insert() was a built-in ColdFusion function. How the heck did I miss this?!? Granted, I am not sure how often I would use something like this, but certainly, I am at the point where I should have all these low-level utility functions committed to memory.

The ColdFusion Insert() method takes a substring, a string, and an index and inserts the given substring into the given string after the given index. If the index is zero, the substring is prepended to the string. Take a look at this example:

  • <!--- Create a string. --->
  • <cfset strText = "Mind if I massage your feet?" />
  •  
  • <!--- Insert the term "sexy" before the word feet. --->
  • <cfset strText = Insert(
  • <!--- The string we are inserting. --->
  • "sexy ",
  •  
  • <!--- The string we are modifying. --->
  • strText,
  •  
  • <!--- The index AFTER which we insert the new string. --->
  • REFind( "(?i)\sfeet", strText )
  • ) />
  •  
  • <!--- Output the string. --->
  • #strText#

Running the above code gives us the following output:

Mind if I massage your sexy feet?

In my example, I am using ColdFusion's REFind() method to find the index at which to insert. Since Insert() inserts the substring AFTER the index, I am including the space (\s) in my regular expression. This example is simple, but it is not a great example - if REFind() failed to find a match, it would return zero. Zero, in our case would not hault the Insert() method, but instead, it would prepend the substring to the string - probably not something we would intend on doing.

Anyway, I hate it when functions like this either completely slide under my radar or at least don't get stuck in my memory. Sloppy, sloppy, sloppy :)




Reader Comments

Ha ha ha ha... Charlie, I think I even remember reading that post. I remember the phrase "hahaha. silly n00b"... Dang! That was months ago. Why can't I insert... Insert into my brain!!!

That's it! I'm using Insert() somehow in every algorithm going forward until it sticks :)

Ben,

Can you update this post with an example of comparing two comma separated lists and using "Insert()" to make the lists equal?

Mike

@Mike,

You could probably just convert both lists to arrays and then using arrayInsertAy(). But, I am not sure I fully understand the question.