Ben Nadel
On User Experience (UX) Design, JavaScript, ColdFusion, Node.js, Life, and Love.
Ben Nadel at CFUNITED 2009 (Lansdowne, VA) with: Randy Brown
Ben Nadel at CFUNITED 2009 (Lansdowne, VA) with: Randy Brown

Synchronizing Magnetic Poetry With Firebase And AngularJS (Without Redux)

By Ben Nadel on

As I've stated before, I'm having a really hard time trying to wrap my head around Flux data architectures, including implementations like Redux. While the philosophy of it seems simple, the details quickly boggle and confuse me. And, even when I look at examples, I find that the details are often further obfuscated by React and React-oriented aspects of Flux. As such, I wanted to setup an AngularJS demo that could act as my base for learning Redux. I wanted to create something sufficiently complex so as to exercise important data life-cycle concerns while, at the same time, being able to fit it all in one file without it being overly intimidating. I settling on synchronizing magnetic poetry with Firebase.


 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 

Run this demo in my JavaScript Demos project on GitHub.

I really wanted to use Firebase because, while I find it fascinating, I've always felt that Firebase - as an implementation detail - leaked into the Controller too much. Meaning, the Controller had to setup a Firebase reference in order to listen for data changes. When I saw Flux and Redux, it seemed like it offered a way for me to move Firebase details out of the Controller and leave the controller oblivious to all data transportation mechanisms.

NOTE: Even with Redux, I might find that I am not happy with how I am implementing Firebase, which could be a "smell" for where I think the knowledge about the Firebase references belongs. I'm still learning how to best integrate Firebase in a clean architecture.

I also wanted to create an application in which a single view had to change the data that it was watching so that WebSocket bindings had to change based on state changes. As such, I created two sets of magnetic poetry pieces, each with a different rating. The PG-rated set contains your standard magnetic poetry pieces and the R-rated set contains your adult-oriented magnetic poetry pieces. As you switch from set to set, the Controller has to change which Firebase reference it holds, thereby changing the mutation events that it is listening for.

As you will see in the BodyController, the AngularJS controller knows a good deal about state:

  • isLoading
  • surfaceWidth
  • surfaceHeight
  • form.filter
  • pieces
  • rating
  • queryNode

Some of this state changes over time. Some of it is constant based on application configuration data. In my AngularJS applications, this all lives in the Controller. The Controller knows where to get it and how to watch it for changes. And, running this AngularJS application leads to this interface:


 
 
 

 
 Synchronizing magnetic poetry with Firebase and AngularJS. 
 
 
 

... which is instantly synchronized across browsers using Firebase WebSocket technology.

The state, maintained in the Controller, is the stuff that will be moving in part (or in whole) to a Redux store. At least, I think. I haven't gotten that far.

Here's the code that powers this. It's about 800-lines; but, the important stuff is all in the BodyController - this is where I think I'll be truly integrating Redux in a subsequent blog post.

  • <!doctype html>
  • <html ng-app="Demo">
  • <head>
  • <meta charset="utf-8" />
  •  
  • <title>
  • Synchronizing Magnetic Poetry With Firebase And AngularJS
  • </title>
  •  
  • <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="//fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Lora:400,700"></link>
  • <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="./demo.css"></link>
  • </head>
  • <!-- CAUTION: Using Body as an element directive. -->
  • <body>
  •  
  • <h1>
  • Synchronizing Magnetic Poetry With Firebase And AngularJS
  • </h1>
  •  
  • <div class="board">
  •  
  • <ul
  • class="pieces"
  • ng-style="{ width: vm.surfaceWidth, height: vm.surfaceHeight }">
  •  
  • <!-- NOTE: Mouse interactions are handled by the Body directive. -->
  • <li
  • ng-repeat="piece in vm.pieces track by piece.id"
  • class="piece {{ piece.modifier }}"
  • ng-class="{ excluded: piece.isExcludedByFilter }"
  • ng-style="{ left: piece.x, top: piece.y, zIndex: piece.stackOrder }">
  • {{ piece.text }}
  • </li>
  •  
  • </ul>
  •  
  • <div ng-if="vm.isLoading" class="loading">
  • <span>Loading...</span>
  • </div>
  •  
  • </div>
  •  
  • <form class="controls">
  •  
  • <input
  • type="text"
  • ng-model="vm.form.filter"
  • ng-change="vm.applyFilter()"
  • placeholder="Search for piece..."
  • />
  •  
  • <div class="ratings">
  •  
  • Ratings:
  •  
  • <a
  • ng-click="vm.showRating( 'pg' )"
  • ng-class="{ on: ( vm.rating == 'pg' ) }">
  • PG-13
  • </a>
  • <a
  • ng-click="vm.showRating( 'r' )"
  • ng-class="{ on: ( vm.rating == 'r' ) }">
  • R
  • </a>
  •  
  • </div>
  •  
  • </form>
  •  
  •  
  • <!-- Load scripts. -->
  • <script type="text/javascript" src="../../vendor/jquery/jquery-2.1.0.min.js"></script>
  • <script type="text/javascript" src="../../vendor/lodash/lodash-3.9.3.min.js"></script>
  • <script type="text/javascript" src="../../vendor/firebase/firebase-2.3.2.min.js"></script>
  • <script type="text/javascript" src="../../vendor/angularjs/angular-1.4.7.min.js"></script>
  • <script type="text/javascript">
  •  
  • // Create an application module for our demo.
  • angular.module( "Demo", [] );
  •  
  •  
  • // --------------------------------------------------------------------------- //
  • // --------------------------------------------------------------------------- //
  •  
  •  
  • // I provide global configuration values for the demo.
  • angular.module( "Demo" ).value(
  • "config",
  • {
  • firebaseUrl: "https://magnetic-poetry.firebaseio.com/",
  •  
  • // CAUTION: These are used for both display as well as for the
  • // distribution of pieces during board initialization / population.
  • surfaceWidth: 3000,
  • surfaceHeight: 1500
  • }
  • );
  •  
  •  
  • // --------------------------------------------------------------------------- //
  • // --------------------------------------------------------------------------- //
  •  
  •  
  • // I provide the root application component (using the Body tag).
  • angular.module( "Demo" ).directive(
  • "body",
  • function bodyDirective( $document ) {
  •  
  • // Return the directive configuration object.
  • return({
  • controller: "BodyController",
  • controllerAs: "vm",
  • link: link,
  • restrict: "E"
  • });
  •  
  •  
  • // I bind the JavaScript events to the local view-model.
  • function link( scope, element, attributes, controller ) {
  •  
  • // I keep track of the selected piece and view-model.
  • var selectedTarget = null;
  • var selectedPiece = null;
  •  
  • // I keep track of the initial click coordinates.
  • var selectedOffset = null;
  • var clickCoordinates = null;
  •  
  • // I keep track of the scroll-offset of the viewport.
  • var scrollOffset = {
  • x: 0,
  • y: 0
  • };
  •  
  • // I keep track of DOM element instances.
  • var dom = {
  • board: element.find( "div.board" )
  • };
  •  
  • // Set up event handlers.
  • // --
  • // CAUTION: To keep things simple, we're going to keep event bindings
  • // in place even when they are not needed. Then, we'll differentiate
  • // need in the handler itself.
  • $document.on( "mousedown", handleMousedown );
  • $document.on( "mousemove", handleMousemove );
  • $document.on( "mouseup", handleMouseup );
  • dom.board.on( "scroll", handleScroll );
  •  
  •  
  • // ---
  • // PRIVATE METHODS.
  • // ---
  •  
  •  
  • // I handle the mousedown event, starting to drag the target piece.
  • function handleMousedown( event ) {
  •  
  • var target = angular.element( event.target );
  •  
  • if ( target.is( ".piece" ) ) {
  •  
  • // Keep track of the currently selected DOM element and the
  • // actual view-model piece that it represents.
  • selectedTarget = target;
  • selectedOffset = target.offset();
  • selectedPiece = target.scope().piece;
  •  
  • // Keep track of the current scroll-offset so that we can
  • // properly position the target as it is dragged.
  • scrollOffset.x = dom.board.scrollLeft();
  • scrollOffset.y = dom.board.scrollTop();
  •  
  • // Keep track of the click coordinates so we can calculate
  • // the drag-delta.
  • clickCoordinates = {
  • x: event.pageX,
  • y: event.pageY
  • };
  •  
  • // Tell the controller which piece has been selected.
  • scope.$apply(
  • function changeViewModel() {
  •  
  • controller.selectPiece( selectedPiece );
  •  
  • }
  • );
  •  
  • // Prevent accidental high-lighting of elements.
  • event.preventDefault();
  •  
  • }
  •  
  • }
  •  
  •  
  • // I handle the mousemove events, potentially updating the position
  • // of the selected target.
  • function handleMousemove( event ) {
  •  
  • if ( ! selectedTarget ) {
  •  
  • return;
  •  
  • }
  •  
  • // NOTE: Even though the delta, alone, doesn't make sense, it
  • // will help figure out the translated mouse coordinates when
  • // used in conjunction with the scrollable viewport.
  • var deltaX = ( event.pageX - clickCoordinates.x );
  • var deltaY = ( event.pageY - clickCoordinates.y );
  •  
  • // Tell the controller about the updated position of the target.
  • // --
  • // NOTE: This will update the piece via the data-flow - we don't
  • // update the location of the piece directly.
  • scope.$apply(
  • function changeViewModel() {
  •  
  • controller.positionPiece(
  • selectedPiece.id,
  • ( scrollOffset.x + selectedOffset.left + deltaX ),
  • ( scrollOffset.y + selectedOffset.top + deltaY )
  • );
  •  
  • }
  • );
  •  
  • }
  •  
  •  
  • // I handle the mouseup event.
  • function handleMouseup( event ) {
  •  
  • selectedTarget = null;
  • selectedOffset = null;
  • selectedPiece = null;
  • clickCoordinates = null;
  •  
  • }
  •  
  •  
  • // I handle the scroll event, making sure that our drag-offsets
  • // are kept in sync.
  • function handleScroll( event ) {
  •  
  • scrollOffset.x = dom.board.scrollLeft();
  • scrollOffset.y = dom.board.scrollTop();
  •  
  • }
  •  
  • }
  •  
  • }
  • );
  •  
  • // I control the body component.
  • angular.module( "Demo" ).controller(
  • "BodyController",
  • function BodyController( $scope, config, poetryService, firebaseService ) {
  •  
  • var vm = this;
  •  
  • // I determine if asynchronous data is being loaded.
  • vm.isLoading = false;
  •  
  • // I hold the dimensions of the magnetic surface.
  • vm.surfaceWidth = config.surfaceWidth;
  • vm.surfaceHeight = config.surfaceHeight;
  •  
  • // I hold the form values for the ng-model bindings.
  • vm.form = {
  • filter: ""
  • };
  •  
  • // I am the collection of magnetic pieces.
  • vm.pieces = [];
  •  
  • // I am the rating of the pieces that are currently being displayed.
  • vm.rating = "pg";
  •  
  • // I keep track of the subset of pieces that are being monitored
  • // for remote changes so that the local pieces can be synchronized
  • // across different experiences.
  • // --
  • // NOTE: I am HOPING that this implementation detail is exactly what
  • // can be removed when using Flux / Redux type data flows.
  • var queryNode = null;
  •  
  • loadBoard();
  •  
  • // Expose the public methods.
  • vm.applyFilter = applyFilter;
  • vm.positionPiece = positionPiece;
  • vm.selectPiece = selectPiece;
  • vm.showRating = showRating;
  •  
  •  
  • // ---
  • // PUBLIC METHODS.
  • // ---
  •  
  •  
  • // I apply the current filter to the pieces, adjusting exclusion.
  • function applyFilter() {
  •  
  • var filter = vm.form.filter.toLowerCase();
  •  
  • _.each( vm.pieces, applyFilterToPiece );
  •  
  •  
  • function applyFilterToPiece( piece ) {
  •  
  • piece.isExcludedByFilter = ( filter && ( piece.text.indexOf( filter ) === -1 ) );
  •  
  • }
  •  
  • }
  •  
  •  
  • // I reposition the given piece to be at the given coordinates.
  • function positionPiece( id, x, y ) {
  •  
  • var piece = _.find(
  • vm.pieces,
  • {
  • id: id
  • }
  • );
  •  
  • // Optimistically update the local data.
  • piece.x = x;
  • piece.y = y;
  •  
  • // Synchronize to the remote data store.
  • poetryService.setPosition( piece.id, piece.x, piece.y );
  •  
  • }
  •  
  •  
  • // I select the given piece, bringing it to the front. This will
  • // also clear any filtering.
  • function selectPiece( piece ) {
  •  
  • // Find the piece with the highest stack order - we're always
  • // going to move the selected piece to the front (of all pieces).
  • var topPiece = _.max(
  • vm.pieces,
  • function operator( piece ) {
  •  
  • return( piece.stackOrder );
  •  
  • }
  • );
  •  
  • // Make sure the piece actually needs to be moved.
  • if ( topPiece.id !== piece.id ) {
  •  
  • // Optimistically update the local data.
  • piece.stackOrder = ( topPiece.stackOrder + 1 );
  •  
  • // Synchronize to the remote data store.
  • poetryService.setStackOrder( piece.id, piece.stackOrder );
  •  
  • }
  •  
  • vm.form.filter = "";
  • applyFilter();
  •  
  • }
  •  
  •  
  • // I load the pieces with the given rating into the board.
  • function showRating( newRating ) {
  •  
  • vm.rating = newRating;
  • loadBoard();
  •  
  • }
  •  
  •  
  • // ---
  • // PRIVATE METHODS.
  • // ---
  •  
  •  
  • // I augment the given piece for use in the local view-model.
  • function augmentPiece( piece ) {
  •  
  • piece.isExcludedByFilter = false;
  •  
  • return( piece );
  •  
  • }
  •  
  •  
  • // I augment the given pieces for use in the local view-model.
  • function augmentPieces( pieces ) {
  •  
  • return( _.each( pieces, augmentPiece ) );
  •  
  • }
  •  
  •  
  • // I handle change events on the pieces in our currently monitored
  • // collection of pieces.
  • function handleChildChange( snapshot ) {
  •  
  • var piece = _.find(
  • vm.pieces,
  • {
  • id: snapshot.key()
  • }
  • );
  •  
  • var value = snapshot.val();
  •  
  • piece.x = value.x;
  • piece.y = value.y;
  • piece.snapshot = value.snapshot;
  •  
  • // Because these event are not always triggered asynchronously,
  • // we need to be careful about when we tell AngularJS about the
  • // change. Do it in the future.
  • // --
  • // NOTE: This performs some implicit debouncing as well.
  • $scope.$applyAsync();
  •  
  • }
  •  
  •  
  • // I load the pieces on to the board.
  • // --
  • // NOTE: If there are no pieces in the remote store, a new collection
  • // of pieces will be generated.
  • function loadBoard() {
  •  
  • vm.isLoading = true;
  •  
  • poetryService.getPieces( vm.rating ).then(
  • function handleResolve( pieces ) {
  •  
  • vm.pieces = augmentPieces( pieces );
  •  
  • // Apply any existing filtering to the collection.
  • applyFilter();
  •  
  • // Now that we have our pieces rendered locally, start
  • // watching for changes in the remote data store.
  • watchForChildChanges();
  •  
  • // Flag board as loaded.
  • vm.isLoading = false;
  •  
  • },
  • function handleReject( reason ) {
  •  
  • // If the reason is that the board is empty, let's populate
  • // the board with a new collection for the current rating
  • // and then try loading it again.
  • if ( reason === "empty" ) {
  •  
  • poetryService
  • .populateBoard( vm.rating )
  • .then( loadBoard )
  • ;
  •  
  • }
  •  
  • }
  • );
  •  
  • }
  •  
  •  
  • // I watch for changes in the subset of pieces that belong to the
  • // current rating system.
  • function watchForChildChanges() {
  •  
  • // If we were already watching for child changes on a previous query
  • // node, unbind the current handler.
  • if ( queryNode ) {
  •  
  • queryNode.off( "child_changed", handleChildChange );
  •  
  • }
  •  
  • // Start watching the new subset of pieces under the selected rating.
  • queryNode = firebaseService
  • .ref( "pieces/" )
  • .orderByChild( "rating" )
  • .equalTo( vm.rating )
  • ;
  •  
  • queryNode.on( "child_changed", handleChildChange );
  •  
  • }
  •  
  • }
  • );
  •  
  •  
  • // --------------------------------------------------------------------------- //
  • // --------------------------------------------------------------------------- //
  •  
  •  
  • // I provide access and mutation methods for the poetry data.
  • angular.module( "Demo" ).factory(
  • "poetryService",
  • function poetryServiceFactory( $q, config, firebaseService, wordGenerator ) {
  •  
  • // Return the public API.
  • return({
  • addPiece: addPiece,
  • getPieces: getPieces,
  • populateBoard: populateBoard,
  • setPosition: setPosition,
  • setStackOrder: setStackOrder
  • });
  •  
  •  
  • // ---
  • // PUBLIC METHODS.
  • // ---
  •  
  •  
  • // I add a new piece with the given settings. Returns a promise.
  • function addPiece( settings ) {
  •  
  • testRating( settings.rating );
  •  
  • var deferred = $q.defer();
  •  
  • firebaseService
  • .ref( "pieces/" )
  • .push(
  • {
  • rating: settings.rating,
  • text: settings.text,
  • modifier: settings.modifier,
  • x: settings.x,
  • y: settings.y,
  • stackOrder: ( settings.stackOrder || 1 ),
  • },
  • generateCallbackHandler( deferred )
  • )
  • ;
  •  
  • return( deferred.promise );
  •  
  • }
  •  
  •  
  • // I get the collection of pieces. Returns a promise.
  • function getPieces( rating ) {
  •  
  • testRating( rating );
  •  
  • var deferred = $q.defer();
  •  
  • firebaseService
  • .ref( "pieces/" )
  • .orderByChild( "rating" )
  • .equalTo( rating )
  • .once(
  • "value",
  • function hanldeValue( snapshot ) {
  •  
  • snapshot.exists()
  • ? deferred.resolve( toArray( snapshot.val() ) )
  • : deferred.reject( "empty" )
  • ;
  •  
  • }
  • )
  • ;
  •  
  • return( deferred.promise );
  •  
  • }
  •  
  •  
  • // I populate the board with new pieces.
  • function populateBoard( rating ) {
  •  
  • testRating( rating );
  •  
  • // To populate the board, we're going to generate a collection of
  • // words and then add them, individually, to the remote store.
  • var promise = wordGenerator.generate( rating )
  • .then(
  • function hanldeResolve( words ) {
  •  
  • var promises = words.map(
  • function operator( word ) {
  •  
  • return(
  • addPiece({
  • rating: rating,
  • text: word,
  • modifier: getRandomModifier(),
  • x: Math.floor( Math.random() * config.surfaceWidth ),
  • y: Math.floor( Math.random() * config.surfaceHeight )
  • })
  • );
  •  
  • }
  • );
  •  
  • return( $q.all( promises ) );
  •  
  • }
  • )
  • ;
  •  
  • return( promise );
  •  
  • }
  •  
  •  
  • // I set the coordinates of the given piece. Returns a promise.
  • function setPosition( id, x, y ) {
  •  
  • var promise = updatePiece(
  • id,
  • {
  • x: x,
  • y: y
  • }
  • );
  •  
  • return( promise );
  •  
  • }
  •  
  •  
  • // I set the stack order of the given piece. Returns a promise.
  • function setStackOrder( id, stackOrder ) {
  •  
  • var promise = updatePiece(
  • id,
  • {
  • stackOrder: stackOrder
  • }
  • );
  •  
  • return( promise );
  •  
  • }
  •  
  •  
  • // ---
  • // PRIVATE METHODS.
  • // ---
  •  
  •  
  • // I generate an onComplete handler that will resolve or reject the given
  • // deferred object depending on the existing of the Firebase error.
  • function generateCallbackHandler( deferred ) {
  •  
  • return( handleCallback );
  •  
  • function handleCallback( error ) {
  •  
  • ( error === null )
  • ? deferred.resolve()
  • : deferred.reject( error )
  • ;
  •  
  • deferred = null;
  •  
  • }
  •  
  • }
  •  
  •  
  • // I get a random modifier for the piece rotation.
  • function getRandomModifier() {
  •  
  • return( _.sample( [ "h", "cw", "h", "ccw" ] ) );
  •  
  • }
  •  
  •  
  • // I test to make sure the given rating is supported. If it is, I quietly
  • // return out. If not, I throw an error.
  • function testRating( rating ) {
  •  
  • switch ( rating ) {
  • case "pg":
  • case "r":
  • return;
  • break;
  • default:
  • throw( new Error( "Only [pg,r] ratings are supported." ) );
  • break;
  • }
  •  
  • }
  •  
  •  
  • // I map the given collection of pieces to an array. Since Firebase
  • // doesn't love using arrays, we're storing the piece data as an object
  • // that is keyed on the unique ID of the object. However, locally, we
  • // love arrays. So, this maps the object collection into an array
  • // collection and injects the unique ID of each piece.
  • function toArray( pieces ) {
  •  
  • var array = _.map(
  • pieces,
  • function operator( value, key ) {
  •  
  • value.id = key;
  •  
  • return( value );
  •  
  • }
  • );
  •  
  • return( array );
  •  
  • }
  •  
  •  
  • // I update the given piece with the given properties. Returns a promise.
  • // --
  • // CAUTION: Private method - all external updates should provide explicit
  • // properties or require explicit properties in the .update() so that the
  • // code is self-documenting.
  • function updatePiece( id, properties ) {
  •  
  • var deferred = $q.defer();
  •  
  • firebaseService
  • .ref( "pieces/" + id )
  • .update(
  • properties,
  • generateCallbackHandler( deferred )
  • )
  • ;
  •  
  • return( deferred.promise );
  •  
  • }
  •  
  • }
  • );
  •  
  •  
  • // --------------------------------------------------------------------------- //
  • // --------------------------------------------------------------------------- //
  •  
  •  
  • // I generate collections of words.
  • angular.module( "Demo" ).factory(
  • "wordGenerator",
  • function wordGeneratorFactory( $q, $http ) {
  •  
  • // Return the public API.
  • return({
  • generate: generate
  • });
  •  
  •  
  • // ---
  • // PUBLIC METHODS.
  • // ---
  •  
  •  
  • // I generate a collection of words using the given rating. Returns
  • // a promise.
  • function generate( rating ) {
  •  
  • var url = ( rating === "r" )
  • ? "./words-r.txt"
  • : "./words-pg.txt"
  • ;
  •  
  • var promise = $http.get( url ).then(
  • function handleResolve( response ) {
  •  
  • // Split file into word tokens on new lines.
  • return( response.data.split( /[\r\n]+/g ) );
  •  
  • }
  • );
  •  
  • return( promise );
  •  
  • }
  •  
  • }
  • );
  •  
  •  
  • // --------------------------------------------------------------------------- //
  • // --------------------------------------------------------------------------- //
  •  
  •  
  • // I provide a service that creates Firebase references that are already scoped
  • // to the right Firebase URL for the application.
  • angular.module( "Demo" ).factory(
  • "firebaseService",
  • function firebaseServiceFactory( $window, config ) {
  •  
  • var Firebase = $window.Firebase;
  •  
  • // Return the public API.
  • return({
  • ref: ref,
  • core: Firebase
  • });
  •  
  •  
  • // ---
  • // PUBLIC METHODS.
  • // ---
  •  
  •  
  • // I create a new Firebase reference at the given sub-path.
  • function ref( path ) {
  •  
  • return( new Firebase( config.firebaseUrl + normalizePath( path ) ) );
  •  
  • }
  •  
  •  
  • // ---
  • // PRIVATE METHODS.
  • // ---
  •  
  •  
  • // I normalize the paths so that they never start with a leading slash,
  • // but always end with a trailing slash.
  • function normalizePath( path ) {
  •  
  • // Strip off leading of trailing slashes.
  • path = path.replace( /^\/+|\/+$/g, "" );
  •  
  • // Append a trailing slash, but only if the path has a length. If
  • // the path is empty, we want to expose the root node.
  • if ( path ) {
  •  
  • path = ( path + "/" );
  •  
  • }
  •  
  • return( path );
  •  
  • }
  •  
  • }
  • );
  •  
  • </script>
  •  
  • </body>
  • </html>

The point of this blog post wasn't really to explain the above code but rather to paint the context for a refactoring with Redux. When I look at Flux and Redux, my gut tells me that they solve a problem that is really important. But, I just haven't been able to wrap my head around it. Now that I have a concrete problem to solve, I'm hoping that refactoring state and actions will be more manageable. More to come!




Reader Comments

You're not alone in this confusion. I finally settled into a codebase that uses redux with ng-redux and am happy with the results so far. However, it seems pretty confusing for simple applications, so I'm holding out hope that it will really pay off as the complexity grows.

Reply to this Comment

@Sam,

Cool - I'm glad I'm not the only one who finds it a bit confusing. Though, I guess each person has things that just "click." For example, I really like AngularJS directives, and I know they really confuse a lot of people. Conversely, I see a lot of people loving and understanding Flux / Redux and, for me, it just hasn't come close to clicking yet.

Reply to this Comment

Post A Comment

You — Get Out Of My Dreams, Get Into My Comments
Live in the Now
Oops!
Comment Etiquette: Please do not post spam. Please keep the comments on-topic. Please do not post unrelated questions or large chunks of code. And, above all, please be nice to each other - we're trying to have a good conversation here.