Ben Nadel
On User Experience (UX) Design, JavaScript, ColdFusion, Node.js, Life, and Love.
I am the chief technical officer at InVision App, Inc - a prototyping and collaboration platform for designers, built by designers. I also rock out in JavaScript and ColdFusion 24x7.
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Ben Nadel at Scotch On The Rocks (SOTR) 2011 (Edinburgh) with:

Javascript Bible Update

By Ben Nadel on

Just rounded page 700 in the Javascript Bible. So far, I have been half skimming, half reading the chapters. It's mostly review for me at the moment. I have picked up one or two tid bits that I didn't already know. I am excited to eventually get to the Style sheet stuff. I have never altered a style sheet rule via Javascript. I have altered styles on an object, but I think it would be interesting to mess with the style definitions.

I have to say though, the Javascript Bible is extremely comprehensive. They really go through every single definition of every object in Javascript. And, what's really nice is that they show the compatibility of different methods and properties across the main browsers (including what versions introduced what features ex: WinIE4+, MacIE-, NN4+, Moz+, Saf-).

At the moment, I am not sure if the book is worth reading for a veteran web developer. But, then again, I do have 400 more pages to go.

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Reader Comments

That's interesting that you are reading it cover to cover and have found the process beneficial. I usually stay away from the bible style tech books, seeing them as more of a reference that I could just Google info. for instead. Maybe this one is different.

By far the best JS book I've come across is 'Javascript for Web Developers' by Nicholas Zakas. Very instructional, very inspiring.

Student Organization Guy,

The Javascript Bible is by FAR a reference book + explanation. I have actually stopped at about page 800 (to be continued when I have more time). It is very dry. That is not to say it is not very good.

I agree that you can google most things. The problem I find is that I can only google what I know or can describe. When I read a book like the Javascript Bible, I am waiting for that "Ooh Ahhh" moment where I see something I have never seen before, or would have never thought to even Google. So far, it's pretty much review, but you never know.

Good call. I remember the first time I needed to use a closure, the problem was I didn't know the concept existed and that it had a name. I'm sure going through a book like that will help fill in all your gaps.

Enjoy :)

SOG,

Yeah, actually closure is a really crazy thing if you are not in the mind set to think about it. I had a "closure" eureka moment a few months ago and it still confuses me occationally.

anyway it sounds interesting, i think i have to get the time to read it too. btw. i`m no veteran so it would be very usefull ;)